Stem cell – or bone marrow – transplant

10 November 2010
A stem cell – or bone marrow – transplant allows children to have much higher doses of chemotherapy than they could otherwise tolerate. This improves the chances of curing their cancer but has more side effects.

Very high doses of chemotherapy destroy the blood stem cells in bone marrow, so after high-dose chemotherapy a child will be given stem cells as a drip. These make their way to the bone marrow and start producing blood cells again.

Stem cell transplants can also bring about an important curative effect in leukaemia patients, known as graft versus leukaemia.

Read more: Stem cell transplantation
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