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  • diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) |
  • high-grade glioma (HGG) |
  • Immunotherapy projects

TCR-transduced T cells for immunotherapy of paediatric high grade glioma

Professor John Anderson, UCL Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital

Diffuse intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) and other gliomas in children remain some of the most difficult childhood cancers to treat, and new therapies are urgently needed to save the lives of children with these conditions. ...

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  • Neuroblastoma

The developmental history of bilateral neuroblastoma

Sarah Farndon, UCL Institute of Child Health

Neuroblastoma is one of the most common solid tumours affecting children, and remains very difficult to treat. Several studies have already used Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to examine somatic alterations (the changes in DNA which ...

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  • diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma |
  • diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) |
  • Precision Medicine

Investigation of a harmless prokaryotic virus for intravenous targeting delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids to DIPG

Dr Amin Hajitou, Imperial College

Paediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a highly aggressive tumour, found at the base of the brain. Despite developments in cancer treatments – both in terms of new drugs and delivery methods – it ...

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  • Neuroblastoma

Mutational dynamics and their effect on chemoresistance and metastasis in a genetically engineered mouse model of relapsed neuroblastoma

Dr Elizabeth Calton, The Institute of Cancer Research

Neuroblastoma is one of the most common solid tumours affecting children, and these days some forms of it are very treatable. But in high risk types, long-term survival rates are only 50%, particularly when a ...

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  • diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) |
  • paediatric glioblastoma (pGBM)

The role of interclonal communication and the tumour microenvironment in driving paediatric GBM and DIPG migration and invasion

Dr Maria Vinci, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital – IRCCS

Despite advances in our treatments for many types of cancer, the survival rate for children affected by tumours like paediatric glioblastoma (pGBM) and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) remains low, and we urgently need new ...

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  • Precision Medicine

Children’s Brain Tumour Drug Delivery Consortium

Professor David Walker, Children’s Brain Tumour Research Centre, The University of Nottingham

Childhood brain tumours have remained difficult to treat, despite many advances in cancer treatments in recent years. One important reason for this is the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is intended to protect the brain, ...

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Current research

One of the greatest medical success stories of the last century is the amazing growth in the survival from childhood cancer. Fifty years ago, only a quarter of children diagnosed with cancer survived. Today, more than 80 per cent of young patients can be successfully treated.

However, cancer still claims the lives of around 250 children every year in the UK. And unfortunately the children who survive may be left with serious health and developmental problems as a result of the intensive treatments used to save their young lives.

Through our investment in research, we are taking forward our understanding of childhood cancer, to give new insights into ways of treating young patients with even the most difficult forms of cancer. We hope to drive up the survival rate still further whilst reducing the risk of harm.