Newsletter Signup x

  • Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

The genetics of familial leukaemia

Dr Elspeth Payne, UCL Cancer Institute

A large number of genetic mutations have been identified in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), with any one child having between 5-20 mutations. The role played by these mutations, alone and in combination, is not fully ...

Read more
  • Ewing Sarcoma

The genetics of familial leukaemia

Dr Ariadna Mendoza, UCL Cancer Institute

When Ewing sarcoma, a tumour of the bone, spreads to other parts of the body, it is difficult to treat and usually fatal. This project builds on previous work that has identified a promising new ...

Read more
  • Neuroblastoma

The genetics of familial leukaemia

Dr David Gilham, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Neuroblastoma is one of the most common solid tumours to occur in children. It can be exceptionally difficult to treat and, despite intensive treatment, around one third of patients cannot currently be cured. In this ...

Read more
  • Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia

The genetics of familial leukaemia

Dr Stefan Meyer, University of Manchester

Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a rare, inherited blood disorder that leads to bone marrow failure. Children with FA have a greatly increased risk of developing leukaemia. Dr Meyer’s research focuses on a gene called EVI1 which is ...

Read more
  • medulloblastoma

The genetics of familial leukaemia

Professor Geoff Pilkington, University of Portsmouth

Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumour of childhood. Although 70% of patients can be cured, the aggressive treatments leave many survivors with significant mental and physical disabilities. Professor Pilkington is developing a new approach ...

Read more
  • Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia

The genetics of familial leukaemia

Professor Vaskar Saha, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

There is wide variability in the way that individual children metabolise different drugs. In this project, Professor Saha is setting out to tailor therapy to individual children based on their drug metabolism, adjusting both the ...

Read more
Load More

Past research projects

One of the greatest medical success stories of the last century is the amazing growth in the survival from childhood cancer. Fifty years ago, only a quarter of children diagnosed with cancer survived. Today, more than 80 per cent of young patients can be successfully treated.

However, cancer still claims the lives of around 250 children every year in the UK. And unfortunately the children who survive may be left with serious health and developmental problems as a result of the intensive treatments used to save their young lives.

Through our investment in research, we are taking forward our understanding of childhood cancer, to give new insights into ways of treating young patients with even the most difficult forms of cancer. We hope to drive up the survival rate still further whilst reducing the risk of harm.