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Army officers marathon feat for Children with Cancer UK

Members of the Household Cavalry have been running seven marathons in seven days this week, in order to raise money for Children with Cancer UK, the UK’s leading national charity dedicated to research into childhood cancer.

2 May 2020

Lt Camm with London models

Cancer survivor Lieutenant Rufus Camm, a Troop Leader in D Squadron of the Household Cavalry, was set to run the 2020 Virgin Money London Marathon on 26 April, and was fundraising for Children with Cancer UK. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the marathon has been postponed until October. Not to be deterred, Lt Camm and other officers set themselves a challenge of running seven marathons in seven days in order to raise funds for the charity. From Sunday 26, the officers have been running a marathon each day in the garden of their barracks in Bulford, Whiltshire where they are currently living due to COVID-19.

 

The 150-meter track has been decorated with drawings and models resembling famous London landmarks such as Elizabeth Tower, Buckingham Palace and the London Eye, in order to bring the streets of London to their army barracks. Each officer has been running 282 laps of the course each day with the fundraising efforts ending on Saturday 2 May, when the six officers will take part in a team relay.

 

The officers are currently confined to their barracks in Bulford, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The six marathon runners are having to reside at the barracks as they are unable to return to their homes for various reasons. Lt Camm is living in the barracks as his girlfriend is an NHS nurse based at UCL Hospital in London, working in the frontline of the fight against COVID-19.

So far, the officers have raised over £3,000 and they have received an outpouring of support from fellow servicemen and women along with the wider armed forces community.

Commenting on his marathon challenge Lt Camm said:

I was obviously disappointed not to be running the marathon, however it has been great to raise money for Children with Cancer UK from our own barracks. I am pleased that through running our own London Marathon course we have been able to support this fantastic charity, which does such great work for childhood cancer patients and their families. Thank you to everyone who has kindly supported our fundraising efforts.

Children with Cancer CEO Mark Brider commented:

I would like to thank Lt Camm and the officers for helping to raise much needed funds for the fight against childhood cancer. Unfortunately, big fundraising events such as the London Marathon that we rely on for much needed funds have been postponed or cancelled, but people can still play their part in tackling childhood cancer through their own fundraising initiatives.

To donate to the fundraiser, visit Rufus Camm’s page here.

For more information and to take part in your own 2.6 Challenge click here. Children with Cancer UK is calling for fundraisers to take part in The 2.6 Challenge in order to raise money for childhood cancer research. The event began on Sunday 26th April and lasts throughout the week. Around £5 million has been raised by charities across the UK.

 

Editors’ Notes

Children with Cancer UK’s press office

E: media@childrenwithcancer.org.uk

T: 0207 404 0808 M: 07 795 956 342

About Children with Cancer UK

Children with Cancer UK is the leading national charity dedicated to research into childhood cancer.

We fund research into the causes and treatment of childhood cancers and provide support for families affected by childhood cancer. We have accelerated breakthroughs to improve childhood cancer survival rates and find kinder, more effective treatments with fewer toxic side effects. This ground-breaking research, which would otherwise go unfunded, saves the lives of children with cancer.  Children with Cancer UK receives no government funding and relies entirely on the generosity of donations from supporters.

About childhood cancer and Children with Cancer UK’s impact

Every day in the UK, 12 children and young people are diagnosed with cancer.

Fifty years ago, only 30% of children with leukaemia survived, and for most other forms of childhood cancer survival rates were even lower. Today, thanks to our supporters and the dedication of visionary researchers like those we fund, more than 80% of young patients can be successfully treated. More vital research is needed though as there are still a number of cancers affecting children and young people with low survival rates and life-limiting side effects. Cancer remains the single largest cause of death from disease in children and young people in the UK.

 

Lt Camm and runners with models