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Medulloblastoma

Medulloblastoma is the most-common, malignant, childhood brain tumour. Although 64% of patients can be cured completely, this comes at a high cost as the aggressive nature of the treatment leaves survivors with a poor quality of life, often suffering serious physical and mental disabilities.

New treatment approaches for medulloblastoma are desperately needed, not only to improve survival rates but, crucially, to reduce the devastating morbidity associated with current treatments. In 2017, our Childhood Cancer conference focused on precision medicine and improving the accuracy of medulloblastoma diagnosis.

Visit Our 2017 Conference Page To Learn More

About Medulloblastoma

Medulloblastoma is a malignant, embryonal brain tumour that develops in the posterior fossa.   Growths here can inhibit the cerebellum, which controls movement and balance in patients. On some occasions, it can spread to other parts of the body, such as the spine or lungs, through the central nervous system (CNS).

Incidence

Medulloblastomas account for 15%-20% all childhood brain tumours; they are most common in children between and 8. Boys are at a slightly higher risk than girls. More than 70% of cases occur in children under the age of 10; incidence decreases significantly with age.

Survival

In cases where a tumour has not spread, survival rates can be as high as 70%. When the disease has spread to other parts of the central nervous system, the survival rate is closer to 60%.

For more information, visit our page on Central Nervous System and Brain Tumours

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Diagnosis

Whilst medulloblastoma symptoms may differ from child to child, they include:

  • Headaches
  • Impaired motor skills
  • Difficulty walking and balancing
  • Tiredness
  • Vomiting or nausea

Medulloblastomas can be diagnosed using several imaging tests, such as CT, MRI or PET scans. Doctors may choose to follow up with a biopsy to confirm the presence of a medulloblastoma.

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Treatment

A combination of treatments for medulloblastomas is currently in use. Surgery is almost always used to remove as much of a tumour as possible.

If a tumour cannot be completely removed this way, a follow-up course of chemotherapy or radiotherapy may be given. Steroids may also be prescribed to reduce the swelling associated with brain tumours, although these do not stop the overall growth.

With surgery playing a large part in treatment, medulloblastoma treatment can be very aggressive.

We are funding a variety of research projects to learn more about how medulloblastoma develops and can be treated. You can read more about these below, or to learn more about CNS tumour treatments, visit our Brain & CNS Tumour page. Our conference, taking place in September 2017, will also feature talks about how diagnosis is being improved.

Visit Our 2017 Conference Page

 

A NEW APPROACH FOR TREATING CHILDHOOD MEDULLOBLASTOMA

A NEW APPROACH FOR TREATING CHILDHOOD MEDULLOBLASTOMA

Using cutting edge molecular genetic techniques, Professor Pilkington’s team is unravelling the biology of medulloblastoma. They have identified the genetic signalling pathways that underlie development of the disease.

Read About Professor Pilkington's Research
NEW TECHNIQUES FOR DELIVERY OF THERAPIES AGAINST MEDULLOBLASTOMA

NEW TECHNIQUES FOR DELIVERY OF THERAPIES AGAINST MEDULLOBLASTOMA

Dr Amin is working on the development of a new way to deliver drugs to the brain bypassing the blood-brain barrier, carried by a special virus. He’ll use something called a bacteriophage particle, which has long been safely administered to both adults and children in antibiotic therapy.

Read About Dr Amin's Research
METABOLIC ANALYSIS OF THE TUMOUR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P73 IN MEDULLOBLASTOMA

METABOLIC ANALYSIS OF THE TUMOUR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P73 IN MEDULLOBLASTOMA

Dr Maria is studying how p73 is involved in MB and in particular its role in metabolic adaptation of these tumours. Her final goal is to understand whether targeting p73 could help treat them.

Read About Dr Maria's Research