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Lincolnshire cancer survivor rings end of treatment bell

A 12-year-old cancer survivor from Lincolnshire spent the weekend celebrating beating cancer, by ringing the end of treatment bell after three years of surgeries and chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Coincidentally his treatment concluded just days before National Cancer Survivors Day.

31 May 2019

Isaac Fell, a Year 8 student at Stamford School, and his family celebrated the joyful occasion at Peterborough Hospital on 31 May, ahead of National Cancer Survivors Day [2 June].

Mother Liz Fell, a criminal lawyer, said:

Celebrating Isaac’s end of treatment was a wonderful experience – after more than three years of treatment, we often wondered if this day would ever come but seeing Isaac ring the bell and finally say goodbye to cancer was absolutely surreal and an emotional high for our family.

We are so thankful for the amazing care he has had throughout his cancer journey. We are grateful to the staff at Peterborough Hospital and the work of charities like Children with Cancer UK – which works hard to improve cure rates, reduce treatment side effects and also provides special days out to families affected by cancer.

Our family has had so many incredible experiences through Children with Cancer UK and these memories will last a lifetime.

Isaac was diagnosed with ALL in February 2016, at nine-years-old, after suffering from back pain in December 2015, following athletics training.

Throughout Isaac’s treatment, the Fell family participated in a host of sports and running events in an effort to raise money for Children with Cancer UK, including the recent London Marathon and the Vitality London 10,000. Liz and sister-in-law Lisa donned symbolic bell costumes for the race last week in celebration of Isaac’s end of treatment. These bells represent the celebratory moment all children with cancer, and their families, look forward to experiencing – ringing the end of treatment bell. In total, the Fell family have raised more than £20,000 for the charity which is a leading funder of childhood research.